Scrapbook Photo 08/02/20 - PA Has LONG Way To Go To Clean Up Our Part Of Chesapeake Bay Watershed: http://bit.ly/2DeUOG2
Free Native Trees Available Through “Trees for Streams” Program

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation is now accepting applications from watershed and community groups and private landowners for free native trees and shrubs under the Trees for Streams Program. Applications are due not later than September 15.

Research conducted by the Stroud Water Research Center found that planting streamside, particularly forested buffers is the single most important step in protecting and enhancing the quality of Pennsylvania’s streams and rivers. (See: Forested Buffers: the Key to Clean Streams.)

Groups must order a minimum of 300 trees and shrubs to be picked up at the Octoraro Native Plant Nursery in Lancaster County.

Streams must be in the Chesapeake Bay watershed to be eligible for the program. Buffers 35 feet or wider (per side) are preferred. Training is available for inexperienced groups. Apply early, supply is limited and is on a first come, first served basis.

“The Trees for Streams program has been a big success, allowing CBF to provide the expertise and trees to over 100 watershed and community groups, along with individual landowners during the last four years,” said CBF PA Watershed Restoration Scientist David Wise. “Streamside buffers are essential for healthy streams and waterways.”

Trees for Streams is supported by both State and Federal funding, specifically through the Department of Environmental Protection’s Growing Greener grant program, as well as through a National Fish and Wildlife Foundation grant program.

In addition to offering free trees and plants, CBF also helps pay for protective tree tubes to improve plant survival. Tree tubes help guard seedlings from damage by deer and small rodents.

Please visit the Trees for Streams Program webpage or contact Cathy Hiebert at 717-234-5550 or chiebert@cbf.org for more information.


8/11/2006

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